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Way Back When

November 20, 2011

(The Spirit is pleased to share with our readers vignettes of life in the 19th century as originally reported in past issues of the newspapers. These reproduced stories include their original headlines and spelling.)

Local Intelligence
(April 15, 1896)

CAPTURED A HORSE-THIEF
David Trainor Steals a Horse from
Henry Brown's Stable

Last Saturday morning George C. Brown, of this town, received word that a handsome, little black horse belonging to him had been stolen from his father's stable at Bell's Mills. Mr. Brown began immediately to telephone to different parts of Indiana county. He gave the operator at Richmond a description of the horse, and was told that a horse of that description had just passed there.

Some parties followed the man with the horse and sulky a little way, saw that he took the road to Decker's Point, and notified Mr. Brown. He then telephoned to Decker's Point, and Murray Thompson of that place was on the lookout for the thief and arrested him. George Brown and his brother Will then drove over to Decker's Point, and brought the horse and rig and thief back with them, arriving here about 7 o'clock in the evening.
The man who stole the horse gave his name as Frank Miller, but when taken into 'Squire Wilson's office, he was recognized as David Trainor, an old offender, who had been charged with numerous crimes, had served considerable time in the penitentiary, and was once sent up for two years from Jefferson county for stealing an ox.

Trainor is originally from Clarion county, but is well known in this vicinity, having worked at Walston.

He is rather a fine looking man physically, and aside from a wild stare, which may have been the result of his situation on Friday night, he would not be taken for a man of desperate character.

In default of $1,000 bail 'Squire Wilson committed Trainor to jail to await trial. He was placed in the lock-up over Sunday, and on Monday Constable Henry Stiver of Clayville, took him to Brookville.

***
Cut Off his Hand
On Monday a Hungarian employed at Walston in drawing coke crawled under a coal flat which was standing on the track beside the oven to rest and cool off. He lay down and fell asleep. After a while the train started, and the noise awoke him. He began to crawl out from in under the car, when a wheel caught his left hand and cut it off. He was taken to Adrian Hospital.

 

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